Place to Remember – Wendover

 
Place to Remember was Art in the Park’s heritage project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund exploring the history of four local buildings in Walworth and Camberwell.

Here are some of the histories and images collected about Wendover, Aylesbury Estate.
 

Interviews

Celia Charles interviewed by Joyce McDonald about living on Wendover
Celia Charles interviewed by Joyce McDonald about living on Wendover
 

Celia Charles 2015


 

Jean Newman 2015


 

Ewa Wiczkowska 2015


 

Workshops and Artwork with 4 Corners and Waterside Care Home

Art Workshop Art in the Park 2015

Art Workshop Art in the Park 2015

Art Workshop Art in the Park 2015

Art Workshop Art in the Park 2015

Art Workshop Art in the Park 2015

About Wendover, Aylesbury Estate

 
The Aylesbury Estate was built in the late 1960s and early 1970s in the aftermath of a large slum clearance programme in this part of south London. There had been a proposal called the ‘Aylesbury Road Development Area’ planned for construction in the late 1960s.  When the former metropolitan boroughs of Bermondsey, Camberwell and Southwark joined to form the London Borough of Southwark in 1965, the scope of the project was extended to include other so-called ‘slum clearance’ areas and a proposal for the 60 acre ‘Aylesbury Development Area’ was approved in 1966.

At this time there was pressure to build homes quickly to help ease the shortage of modern dwellings and the majority of the blocks on the estate are constructed using the Jespersen large panel system. Industrialised building methods were in fashion at the time and the concrete panels were manufactured off-site and then assembled on site and this was quicker than traditional construction methods. The estate was built by John Laing Construction Ltd with an initial budget of £10,996,178.

The homes were built in line with the Parker Morris standards which granted generous space standards and included generous allowances for storage and private amenity space.  It also followed the principles of the modernist architecture movement with “walkways in the sky” – separating pedestrians from street level, which was to be the territory of the motor car and service vehicles – and the homes had modern services and amenities for the time.

Extract with kind permission of Creation Trust’s ‘Put it on the Map’ project.

Images

 
Map of Walworth Common Estate 1842 with kind permission of the Southwark Local History library and Archive
Map of Walworth Common Estate 1842 with kind permission of the Southwark Local History Library and Archive

Aylesbury Estate 1971 Photograph with the kind permission of South London Press
Aylesbury Estate 1971 Photograph with the kind permission of South London Press

Aylesbury Estate 1973 with the kind permission of the Southwark Local History Library and Archive
Aylesbury Estate 1973 with the kind permission of the Southwark Local History Library and Archive

From Martyrs To Modernism Place To Remember Heritage Walk and Talk

 
From Martyrs to Modernism  Heritage Talk and Walk. Southwark Historian Stephen Humphrey, Wendover, Aylesbury Estate 2015. Phot Julia Honess
From Martyrs to Modernism Heritage Talk and Walk. Southwark Historian Stephen Humphrey, Wendover, Aylesbury Estate 2015. Photo Julia Honess

From Martyrs to Modernism Heritage Talk and Walk crossing Thurlow Street 2015. Photo JUlia Honess
From Martyrs to Modernism Heritage Talk and Walk crossing Thurlow Street 2015. Photo Julia Honess

From Martyrs to Modernism walk through Burgess Park showing Wendover. phot Julia Honess
From Martyrs to Modernism walk through Burgess Park showing Wendover. Photo Julia Honess

From Martyrs to Modernism walk throughHeritage Talk and Walk Anna Ludwig and Rufus Willis of Cottrell & Vermeulen, Wendover Aylesbury Estate 2015.Photo Julia Honess
From Martyrs to Modernism walk through Heritage Talk and Walk Anna Ludwig and Rufus Willis of Cottrell & Vermeulen, Wendover Aylesbury Estate 2015. Photo Julia Honess